How to ride in Traffic | Bikes Rider

Yes, it reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Yes, it makes us smarter, healthier and able to concentrate more effectively. However, for those people who ride in everyday traffic – and especially in rush hour, they might think that the benefits of cycling do not outweigh the disadvantages.

For one, the auto vehicle drivers think that Cyclists are their Enemy Number One. Consequently, they never give them an inch of space. As for the trespassers, they think that no matter how fast a cyclist is pedaling, he can stop at will. So, they consider it customary to trespass him.

With these views in our consideration, we’ve decided to solve the problems of urban traffic riders. How to ride in traffic these tips would not only make sure that you reach your destination safely. In addition, they would also teach you how to do it legally. Have a read.

How to ride in Traffic

How to ride in Traffic - Wear a helmet

Although we don’t care to give this much attention, the fact that head injuries – even minor ones are fatal couldn’t be ignored. One of the worst aspects of being succumbed to a head injury is the time it can take for the symptoms to appear.

So, while it won’t save you from being hit by a vehicle, a helmet would make sure that you don’t succumb to the worst injury possible to a human being.

Your clothing should be comfortable

If you are the one riding, make sure that your clothing – pants, tops, and wearing shoes, suit your bicycle. For, if you are wearing a dress which could tangle with your wheels, it would be uncomfortable, and, in some cases, deadly. As for the shoes, we recommend those which have rugged soles.

Always drive in the direction of traffic

Unlike in US and majority of first world countries – where there are laws to govern and regulate the behavior of cyclists, most of the world countries do not pay enough attention to cycling. However, if you’re a cyclist and residing in such an area where laws regarding cycling aren’t enforced, remember that it is your life and your body which might suffer if you don’t obey them.

Hence, whenever you’re in a traffic, make sure to follow the direction of traffic. In this way, you won’t be giving the car drivers the excuse to hit you. Also, stop at the red light and NEVER change lanes without looking behind.

Pass Parked cars with care

In an ideal scenario, a cyclist should remain at a distance of 3 – 5feet from a parked car. In this way, he could make sure that he won’t be caught if the door of the car opens suddenly. However, in urban traffic where cars are mostly bumper to bumper, following this principle is seemingly impossible.

So, whenever you’re passing a parked car, make sure to look through its rear window when you’re behind it. If you’ve seen a person sitting in the driving seat, it is likely that he is about to get out. In this case, slow down and allow him the time to get off the car.

However, if you can’t see his rear view mirror clearly, slow down your speed and try to move further out. In this case, it is imperative that you look behind you to gauge what is coming. For, if you suddenly change your direction to be clear of the car door, you might get hit by a vehicle coming from behind. Hence, change your direction only after looking behind.

Pay Extreme Attention when at Intersections

When there’s an intersection, there is always a car driver who seems to have forgotten where he wants to go – or remembers it at the last instant and takes a last minute turn without looking behind. Watch out for that driver.

Since you can’t guess which car is going to take the turn, always be cautious while approaching an intersection. In this way, even when the driver takes an unforeseen turn, you would be in a position to negotiate it with aplomb.

About the Author Daryl Monson

I am Daryl Monson. This is my personal blog, I’ll mostly talk about Cycling. I have an in-depth experience in writing about Cycling. I would also provide some information about bike and bike accessories. In short, you’ll find a lot of valuable information regarding bike and other bike related stuff.

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